Anaphylaxis (+/- Laryngospasm)

A 7-year-old male presents with wheeze, rash and increased WOB after eating a birthday cake. He has a known allergy to peanuts. The team must initiate usual anaphylaxis treatment including salbutamol for bronchospasm. The patient will then develop worsened hypotension, requiring the start of an epinephrine infusion. After this the patient will experience increased angioedema, prompting the team to consider intubation. If no paralytic is used for intubation (or if intubation is delayed), the patient will experience laryngospasm. The team will be unable to bag-mask ventilate the patient until they ask for either deeper sedation or a paralytic. If a paralytic is used, the team will be able to successfully intubate the child.

Procedural Sedation with Laryngospasm

The emergency team is preparing to perform a conscious sedation on a 7-year-old boy to facilitate the reduction of a fracture of the radius and ulna. They will be expected to do an airway assessment and pick an appropriate agent for sedation. In the middle of sedation, the patient’s oxygen saturation will suddenly drop and the patient will stop breathing. The team will be unable to bag the patient until they ask for either deeper sedation or a paralytic. If they administer succinylcholine, the patient will become bradycardic and require atropine.