Lateral Canthotomy

A 25 y/o M pitching in a Sunday baseball game is hit in the face by a line drive. He is brought to the ED by his friends complaining of decreased visual acuity to his right eye accompanied by significant right peri-orbital swelling. At triage his VA is OD 20/100 OS 20/25 but at the time of assessment VA OD is limited to detection of light and his pupil is fixed and dilated, extra-ocular movements are intact. The team should recognize the need for lateral canthotomy based on the history and physical exam findings (including IOP) and mobilize the appropriate resources for bed-side lateral canthotomy as well as the need for emergent ophthalmology consult.   

Introducing SimLab

Check out SIMLab HERE! This post comes to us from Dr. Tristan Jones who is an Emergency Physician working in Victoria, BC, Canada. He completed medical school in Calgary, and EM residency in Victoria through the University of British Columbia Island Program. Prior to medicine, he studied electrical engineering, and has been programming and developing … Continue reading Introducing SimLab

Virtual Resus Room

Physical distancing restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have dramatically impacted medical education, challenging educators around the world to create interesting, novel ways to engage learners remotely. Virtual alternatives to in-person simulation sessions have been of particular interest. From discussion with other educators, it seems like many programs have shifted to a model of sim that involves talking through challenging cases. This strategy is excellent for medical content review but misses the hands-on, interactive, nervous energy of simulation that makes it so valuable. This is why we set out to create the Virtual Resus Room.

Getting Serious about GridlockED: Lesson Plans to Teach about Systems Improvement

Written by Sonja Wakeling. Edited by Dr. Teresa Chan. Everything I know about ED management I learned from… A Board Game? GridlockED is an innovative board game that fosters teamwork, knowledge acquisition and application, and problem-solving skills. Developed by clinician educators and trainees, it was designed to simulate real-life settings in an emergency department within … Continue reading Getting Serious about GridlockED: Lesson Plans to Teach about Systems Improvement

Limiting Gender Bias in Simulation Assessment

Today's piece is written by Dr. Lall. She is an Associate Professor and Associate Residency Director of Emergency Medicine at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. She is also the current president of the Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine. Dr. Lall’s research focuses include physician wellness and gender bias and inequity in medicine. The … Continue reading Limiting Gender Bias in Simulation Assessment

In Situ Simulation – Part 2: ED in situ simulation for QI at Kelowna General Hospital

This 2 part series was written by Jared Baylis, JoAnne Slinn, and Kevin Clark.  Jared Baylis (@baylis_jared) is a PGY-4 and chief resident at the Interior Site of UBC’s Emergency Medicine residency program (@KelownaEM). He has an interest in simulation, medical education, and administration/leadership and is currently a simulation fellow through the Centre of Excellence … Continue reading In Situ Simulation – Part 2: ED in situ simulation for QI at Kelowna General Hospital

In Situ Simulation – Part 1: Quality Improvement Through Simulation

This 2 part series was written by Jared Baylis, JoAnne Slinn, and Kevin Clark. Part 1 is a review of the literature around in situ simulation for quality improvement and part 2 will detail the emergency department in situ simulation program at Kelowna General Hospital including successes, lessons learned, and suggestions for those of you … Continue reading In Situ Simulation – Part 1: Quality Improvement Through Simulation

Simulation Solutions for Low Resource Settings

This review on simulation teaching in a low resource setting was written by Alia Dharamsi, a PGY 4 in Emergency Medicine at The University of Toronto and 2017 SHRED [Simulation, Health Sciences, Resuscitation for the Emergency Department] Fellow after her Toronto- Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration in Emergency Medicine (TAAAC-EM) elective.  This past November I participated in an … Continue reading Simulation Solutions for Low Resource Settings

Validity – Starting with the Basics

This critique on validity and how it relates to simulation teaching was written by Alia Dharamsi, a PGY 4 in Emergency Medicine at The University of Toronto and 2017 SHRED [Simulation, Health Sciences, Resuscitation for the Emergency Department] Fellow. When designing simulation exercises that will ultimately lead to the assessment and evaluation of a learner’s competency … Continue reading Validity – Starting with the Basics