Undifferentiated Abdominal Pain + Shock

A 67yr old male with multiple comorbidities is brought by ambulance with a 3-day history of diffuse abdominal pain. The history is vague and the differential of his symptoms remains very broad. He develops significantly worsening pain and hypotension and becomes obtunded. As the patient’s condition deteriorates, the team must initiate management of abdominal pain plus shock and support the hemodynamics with vasopressors/inotropes. The team will need to intubate to facilitate advanced imaging and definitive care. 

Airway Obstruction from FB

This case involves a 60-year-old male patient who arrives VSA in PEA after collapsing while eating dinner with family. The collateral history included that he was suspected to be intoxicated. The patient is difficult to bag with EMS. The learner will have to work through the can’t ventilate/can’t oxygenate scenario once they identify that BVM is ineffective. 

Armed Overdose

In this case a 44 y/o M is brought in via EMS after receiving 0.4mg of naloxone for what is suspected to be an opioid overdose. He remains GCS 7 upon arrival in the resuscitation bay. The team will need to work through the differential for altered LoC and will find drug paraphernalia and a loaded weapon on the patient upon inspection. The case will end with successful treatment and consultation with local police with regard to weapon and contraband protocols.

Lateral Canthotomy

A 25 y/o M pitching in a Sunday baseball game is hit in the face by a line drive. He is brought to the ED by his friends complaining of decreased visual acuity to his right eye accompanied by significant right peri-orbital swelling. At triage his VA is OD 20/100 OS 20/25 but at the time of assessment VA OD is limited to detection of light and his pupil is fixed and dilated, extra-ocular movements are intact. The team should recognize the need for lateral canthotomy based on the history and physical exam findings (including IOP) and mobilize the appropriate resources for bed-side lateral canthotomy as well as the need for emergent ophthalmology consult.   

Introducing SimLab

Check out SIMLab HERE! This post comes to us from Dr. Tristan Jones who is an Emergency Physician working in Victoria, BC, Canada. He completed medical school in Calgary, and EM residency in Victoria through the University of British Columbia Island Program. Prior to medicine, he studied electrical engineering, and has been programming and developing … Continue reading Introducing SimLab

Tracheoinnominate Artery Fistula

This case was written by Dr. Brandon Evtushevski. Dr. Evtushevski is an Emergency Medicine resident at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver Island Site. Prior to this, he completed a BSc in Neuroscience at McGill University followed by his MD at the University of British Columbia. He has interests in neurologic emergencies, critical care and … Continue reading Tracheoinnominate Artery Fistula

Pediatric Polytrauma

A 2.5 year old child falls from the 3rd floor balcony and presents to a community hospital. The team is expected to coordinate a thorough trauma survey. The patient will initially demonstrate compensated shock requiring aggressive resuscitation. After this initial phase, findings of severe head injury will become apparent. The team must optimize the patient for transfer to definitive care.

Beta Blocker Toxicity

A 44-year-old male presents to the emergency department following the ingestion of an entire bottle of metoprolol. Decontamination strategies should be utilized alongside consultation with poison control. Patient clinically deteriorates as the drug reaches peak effects, requiring IV fluids, atropine, calcium, glucagon, multi-dose vasopressors, high dose insulin, and a discussion around potential salvage therapies.

TB Pericarditis

A 38 year-old man (Ethiopian refugee) with untreated HIV and past history of TB, presents to the emergency department (ED) with anterior chest pain, shortness of breath and hypotension. He was seen 3 days prior by a walk-in clinic and referred to the ED with chest pain and ECG showing pericarditis, but did not attend the ED until symptoms were severe. In the ED, patient quickly progresses to profound shock and has a PEA arrest. POCUS will show a large pericardial effusion and tamponade. Team members are to initiate CPR, manage the arrest and treat the effusion using bedside pericardiocentesis in order to obtain return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).