Pancreatitis with ARDS

This case is written by Dr. Kyla Caners. She is an emergency physician in Hamilton, Ontario and the Simulation Director of McMaster University’s FRCP-EM program. She is also one of the Editors-in-Chief here at EmSimCases.

Why it Matters

Pancreatitis is a common diagnosis made in the ED. However, severe pancreatitis with shock is relatively rare. As such, this case highlights several important points about the management of a hypotensive patient with abdominal pain:

  • The importance of maintaining a broad differential diagnosis and employing beside imaging in one’s assessment
  • The need for aggressive fluid resuscitation in an acutely hypotensive patient
  • The risk of ARDS with pancreatitis
  • The importance of developing a safe approach to the intubation of a patient who is simultaneously hypoxic and hypotensive

Clinical Vignette

Patricia is a 50 year old female who presents with epigastric abdominal pain. It’s been persistent for the last 24 hours and radiates through to her back. She has been nauseous all day and has been vomiting so much she “can’t keep anything down.” She was “on a bender” this weekend drinking beer and whiskey.

Case Summary

A 50 year-old female who was “on a bender” over the weekend now presents with diffuse abdominal pain and persistent nausea and vomiting. She will have a diffusely tender abdomen, a BP of 80/40, and be tachycardic. The team will need to work through a broad differential diagnosis and should fluid resuscitate aggressively. Once the patient has received 6L of fluid, she will become tachypneic and hypoxic and require intubation. The team will be given a lipase result just prior.

Download the case here: Pancreatitis with ARDS

ECG for the case found here:

Sinus tachycardia

(ECG source: http://cdn.lifeinthefastlane.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/sinus-tachycardia.jpg)

Initial CXR for the case found here:

normal female CXR radiopedia

(CXR source: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/normal-position-of-diaphragms-on-chest-radiography)

ARDS CXR for when patient is hypoxic found here:

Pre-intuabtion

(CXR source: http://www.radiology.vcu.edu/programs/residents/quiz/pulm_ cotw/PulmonConf/09-03-04/68yM%2008-03-04%20CXR.jpg)

Post-intubation CXR for the case found here:

Post intubation

(CXR source: http://courses.washington.edu/med620/images/mv_c3fig1.jpg)

FAST showing no free fluid found here:

no FF

U/S aorta showing no AAA found here:

no AAA

Pericardial U/S showing no effusion found here:

(All U/S images are courtesy of McMaster PoCUS Subspecialty Training Program)

Ruptured Ectopic

This case is written by Dr. Kyla Caners. She is a PGY5 Emergency Medicine resident at McMaster University and is also one of the Editors-in-Chief here at EMSimCases.

Why it Matters

Ectopic pregnancy is a can’t miss diagnosis in Emergency Medicine. This case highlights just how sick patients with ruptured ectopic pregnancies can be. Some important learning points include:

  • The importance to having an approach to the undifferentiated patient with syncope and hypotension
  • The need to order a βHCG in women of child-bearing age who present with syncope
  • The rapid stabilization of a patient with intraperitoneal hemorrhage using massive transfusion.

Clinical Vignette

26 year old female presents after a syncopal episode at home. She immigrated from Cambodia two weeks ago to work as a live-in nanny, but has been feeling unwell for the last 3 days. The patient speaks limited English, but the family she is staying with said she has been vomiting the past few days and was unable to get out of bed this morning. When she tried, she because quite dizzy and then passed out.

Case Summary

26 year-old female, recently immigrated from Cambodia, presents after a syncopal episode at home. At the case outset, she complains of feeling “a little dizzy” and has a HR of 100 and a BP of 90/60. Once the team initiates care, the patient will say she has to vomit and then become poorly responsive and more hypotensive. The patient does not know that she is pregnant, so the team will have to consider the diagnosis early and use bedside U/S to point them in the right direction. The team will then need to initiate a massive transfusion and arrange for surgery. If the ectopic pregnancy is not recognized, the patient will become persistently more hypotensive until she has a PEA arrest.

Download the case here: Ruptured Ectopic

RUQ U/S for the case found here:

RUQ FF

Abdominal U/S with no IUP for the case found here:

(All U/S images are courtesy of McMaster PoCUS Subspecialty Training Program.)

ECG #1 for the case found here:

Sinus tachycardia

(ECG source: http://cdn.lifeinthefastlane.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/sinus-tachycardia.jpg)

ECG #2 for the case found here:

normal-sinus-rhythm

(ECG source: http://cdn.lifeinthefastlane.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/normal-sinus-rhythm.jpg)

Post-intubation CXR for the case found here:

Post-Intubation

Post Intubation

(CXR source: https://emcow.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/normal-intubation2.jpg)

 

Intra-abdominal Sepsis

This case was written by Dr. Martin Kuuskne from McGill University. Dr. Kuuskne is a PGY5 Emergency Medicine resident and one of the editors-in-chief at EMSimCases.

Why it Matters

Although recent literature has challenged the use of protocolized care in the management of sepsis, this case highlights the key points that are crucial in early sepsis care, namely:

  • The recognition of sepsis and identifying a likely source of infection
  • The initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics in the emergency department
  • Hemodynamic resuscitation with intravenous fluids and vasopressor therapy

Clinical Vignette 

You are working a day shift at a community hospital emergency department. You are handed a chart of a patient presenting with abdominal pain. You recognize the following vital signs: Heart rate 120, blood pressure 85/55, respiratory rate 20, and O2 Saturation 95%.

Case Summary

A 60-year-old male presents with a four-day history of abdominal pain secondary to cholangitis. The patient presents in septic shock requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation, empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics and vasopressor support and suffers a PEA arrest prior to disposition to advanced imaging or definitive management.

Download the case here: Cholangitis

ECG for case found here: 

Sinus tachycardia

(ECG source: http://cdn.lifeinthefastlane.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/sinus-tachycardia.jpg)

CXR for case found here: 

CXR

Ultrasound for case found here:

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