Newborn Sepsis with Apneas

This case is written by Dr. Rob Woods. He works in both the adult and pediatric emergency departments in Saskatoon and has been working in New Zealand for the past year. He is the founder and director of the FRCP EM residency program in Saskatchewan.

Why it Matters

This case highlights important manifestations of sepsis in a neonate. In particular, it reinforces that:

  • Apneas, hypoglycemia, and hypothermia are commonly seen as a result of systemic illness in neonates
  • Prolonged or persistent apneas with associated desaturations require management with either high-flow oxygen or intubation
  • Fluid resuscitation and broad-spectrum antibiotics are important early considerations when managing toxic neonates

Clinical Vignette

To be stated by the Paramedic with the Resus Nurse at bedside: “We picked up this term 3-day old male infant at their GPs office. Mom reports poor feeding for the past 12 hours, and two episodes of vomiting. They took him to the GPs office this morning and they found the temperature to be quite low at 33.1°C. They called us concerned about sepsis. We were only 5 minutes away so we have not obtained IV access. We did obtain a glucose level of 2.7. The child is lethargic and has very poor perfusion – peripheral cap refill is 7 seconds. We don’t have a cuff to get an accurate BP but the HR is 190.”

Case Summary

A 3-day-old term male infant is brought to the ED by EMS after being seen at their Family Physician’s office with a low temperature (33.1oC). The child has been feeding poorly for about 12 hours, and has vomited twice. He is lethargic on examination and poorly perfused with intermittent apneas lasting ~ 20 seconds. He requires immediate fluid resuscitation and broad-spectrum antibiotics. His perfusion will improve after IVF boluses, however the apneas will persist and necessitate intubation.

Download the case here: Newborn Sepsis with Apneas

Initial CXR for the case found here:

Normal neonatal CXR

(CXR source: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/414608-overview)

Post-intubation CXR for the case found here:

Post-intubation CXR neonate

(CXR source: https://radiopaedia.org/articles/neonatal-pneumonia)

Coarctation of the Aorta

This case is written by Drs. Quang Ngo and Donika Orlich. Dr. Ngo is an attending emergency physician at McMaster Children’s Hospital and also serves as the Associate Program Director for the Department of Pediatrics. He is also a member of the advisory board here at EMSimCases. Dr. Orlich is a PGY5 Emergency Medicine resident at McMaster University who also completed a fellowship in Simulation and Medical Education last year.

Why it Matters

Having an approach to the toxic neonate is essential. More importantly, emergency physicians must be able to recognize subtle historical clues and physical exam features that point toward congenital heart disease in order to begin critical treatment rapidly. This case highlights the following:

  • The presentation of neonates with congenital heart disease including features like difficulty feeding, CHF, and tachypnea without increased work of breathing
  • The clinical features that may be present in a coarctation of the aorta, one specific type of congenital heart disease, and the resultant need to include four-limb BP’s as part of the work-up of toxic-appearing neonates
  • The importance of beginning a prostaglandin infusion in patients with suspected ductal-dependent congenital heart disease
  • One of the most common side effects of a prostaglandin infusion – apnea

Clinical Vignette

Your triage nurse comes to tell you about an infant she just put in the resuscitation room who she feels looks quite unwell. He is a 2 week old neonate brought to the ED by his mother. Mom was worried because he hasn’t been feeding very well and seems to just get sleepy when feeding. Now he just vomited his last feed and seems really lethargic. She thinks he just “doesn’t look the right colour”.

Case Summary

A 2-week-old neonate presents in shock requiring the learner to implement an initial broad work-up. The patient will also be hypoglycemic, and will seize if this is not promptly recognized. Physical exam and CXR findings will suggest coarctation of the aorta as the likely cause, and the learner should recognize the need for gentle fluid boluses and a prostaglandin infusion. Unless learners anticipate appropriately and intubate the patient prior to beginning the prostaglandins, the infant will become apneic after starting the infusion and require intubation.

Download the case here: Coarctation of the Aorta Case

ECG for the case found here:

coarc-ecg

(ECG source: http://www.omjournal.org/IssueText.aspx?issId=380)

Initial CXR for the case found here:

chf-neonate

(CXR source: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/newborn/TeachingResources/Radiology/CXR/HLHS/CXR-HLHS-congested.jpg)

Post-intubation CXR for the case found here:

chf-neonate-post-intubation

(CXR source: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/newborn/TeachingResources/Radiology/CXR/OtherCHF/NonstructuralCHF.jpg)

For more information on the management of Congenital Heart Disease Emergencies, see the excellent review by Emergency Medicine Cases found here.

Eclampsia with Apnea Secondary to Magnesium Sulfate Administration

This case was written by Dr. Kyla Caners from McMaster University. Dr. Caners is a PGY4 Emergency Medicine resident and one of the editors-in-chief at EMSimCases.

Why It Matters

This case highlights three important aspects of managing an eclamptic patient:

  • Early administration of magnesium sulfate
  • Adding an anti-hypertensive agent if the blood pressure remains elevated after magnesium administration
  • Recognition of apnea as a side effect of magnesium administration; calcium gluconate is an antidote

Clinical Vignette

Miranda Hamm presents to your local tertiary care ED complaining of a headache. She is a 30 year old G1P0 at 32 weeks. She has had a headache since last night. This morning she started feeling nauseous and began vomiting. Now her vision feels blurred, so she came for assessment.

Case Summary

A 30 year-old female, G1P0 at 32 weeks, presents to the ED with headache, blurred vision, nausea, and vomiting. Her arrival BP is 175/115. As the team coordinates her initial workup, the patient will begin to seize. She will not stop seizing until magnesium sulfate is given. The patient will then require intubation for respiratory depression. The patient will also remain hypertensive, requiring administration of an appropriate antihypertensive agent. The case will end post intubation when the patient has been referred to OB.

Download the case here: Eclampsia Case

Post-intubation CXR for case found here:

Post Intubation

Post Intubation

(CXR source: https://emcow.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/normal-intubation2.jpg)